Author: Ankita Katdare

‘This House of Clay and Water’ By Faiqa Mansab | Book Review

Imagine the old streets of historical Lahore, the hustle, and bustle of a Dargah, small dingy cafes near Anarkali Bazaar – that’s where Faiqa Mansab transports you in her debut novel ‘This House of Clay and Water’. As she masterfully weaves the lives of three protagonists to create a delicate fabric of love and desire, we are left with a definite page-turner of a novel that speaks volumes of the human struggle to find its one true place. As is rightly put an old song’s lyrics – ‘One man’s nightmare is another man’s dream..’, Faiqa breathes life into this story...

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‘Before We Visit The Goddess’ By Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni | Book Review

This is one of those rare books which is oddly satisfying and unputdownable, even though at times one may feel – what’s the point of this story at all? And yet, the next moment comes a sentence, a phrase or a dialogue that simply devours you in its narrative. That’s the kind of books Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni writes. Stories that have a soul. Stories that weave a beautiful fabric, the one you touch and know that each of those threads were woven with care. Stories that could be happening in your friendly neighborhood, but still feel out of this world. The author’s latest book Before We Visit The Goddess is no different. It’s a story of three women belonging to three consecutive generations, who affect each other’s lives profoundly, sometimes even without realizing. The three women are a grandmother, a daughter and a granddaughter. The book explores the complex relationship between mothers and daughters and gives us a glimpse at what goes on inside that delicate relationship. In fact, the book turns out to be a real success at showing us the realistic side of the kinship. The beautiful yet damaged, sweet-sour-bitter bonds of love, care, distress and agony that a mother and a daughter share. Coming to the story: The eldest one, Sabitri is the daughter of a poor baker in rural Bengal, India, who is poised about making her mark and she knows that it’s...

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‘The Leadership Sutra’ By Devdutt Pattanaik | Book Review – Drawing Parallels Between Indian Mythology And Management

If like me you too are a fan of Devdutt Pattanaik’s artwork that puts Indian mythology in a whole new light for the entire 21st century generation, you’d enjoy this quick weekend read ‘The Leadership Sutra’ – An Indian Approach to Power as much as I did. At first, it seems far-fetched that an author is trying to equate incidences from the great Indian epics such as the Mahabharata and the Ramayana with today’s company management and power struggle. But when Devdutt takes up this task, he makes it seem so obvious. You are left with no choice but to believe that the power struggle has been the exact same for centuries and there’s a great deal of learning to be received from the amazing Indian epics. This book The Leadership Sutra that spans a little over 100 pages takes you through 4 lessons or sutras of leadership to formulate the management and business techniques that were wholly made in India. The book is divided into 4 parts for different values – Significance, Property, Rules and Stability – each speaking about what constitutes management, how one can become a good manager and why we see what we see in the leadership scenario. There are lessons to be learnt in every chapter. What specifically caught my attention throughout the book was the idea of ‘Durga’ – the Hindu, Buddhist and Jain...

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‘Mother, Where’s My Country?’ by Anubha Bhonsle | Book Review

The reason for me to pick this book is its author – Anubha Bhonsle, the Executive Editor of CNN-IBN based out of India’s capital city. Over the past 10 years, her work in journalism, ​be it about human rights or politics or armed forces, has never once failed to intrigue me. In this non-fictional account, Anubha​ choses a topic that will tug at your heart. The book is about India’s north-eastern state Manipur, where much of her work has been focused. The state which has been ravaged by rampant ethnic rivalries, insurgency and counter-insurgency operations,​ and the inexcusable corruption. The book...

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‘A Strangeness In My Mind’ By Orhan Pamuk | Book Review

There can never be just a few highlight-worthy points that make an Orhan Pamuk novel the page-turner that it always turns out to be. The Nobel Prize-winning author who gave us an eternal panoramic love story in ‘The Museum of Innocence’ and has over the years left us yearning for more, has used this very element of human desire to breathe life in his new book. What strikes me the most about Orhan Pamuk’s style of writing is the myriad of characters he weaves in his tales and the perspectives that unfold as a result. His signature shifting narrative technique is at its most superlative form here. Orhan Pamuk’s latest novel titled A Strangeness In My Mind is story is about Mevlut Karatas and his lifetime set in the period between 1969 to 2012. What makes you pick the novel up from a bookstore’s ‘best-selling’ shelf however is the mention of beautiful city of Istanbul, a location rich in heritage, the center of the world and having one of the world’s most culturally tumultuous history. Set on the backdrop of Istanbul, A Strangeness In My Mind is not just another coming of age story. It is that, but has a lot more beyond it. The chapters expeditiously turn the tale into a series of events where Mevlut’s desire for his life’s calling feels real, and you can’t help yourself but cheer him on to find what is it that he has...

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